THE PAWS BLOG

 
 

House Plants to avoid for cats and dogs

As a fur-parent to a cat or dog, or if you are someone thinking about adopting a new addition into your family, please keep this fact in mind when it comes to plants in your household.

There are plants that have bad effects on animals. If any part of the plant-stems, leaves, blossoms, and pollen are ingested and this goes unattended it can result in poisoning and/or kidney failure. If this happens, please contact your veterinarian or poison control hotline as soon as possible. Time is of the essence.

A few examples of plants to avoid having in your household include:

  • Lillies

  • Peace Lily

  • Autumn Crocus

  • Azalea

  • Cyclamen

  • Daffodils

  • Oleander

  • Mistletoe

  • Kalanchoe

  • Dieffenbachia

  • Tulips

  • Hyacinths

  • Sago Palm

  • Amaryllis

  • Castor Bean

  • Chrysanthemum

  • Pothos

  • English Ivy 

  • Yew

To see the partial list of poisonous plants please click on the photo or go to https://www.petpoisonhelpline.com/pet-owners/basics/top-10-plants-poisonous-to-pets/

*Please note that this plant list is not meant to be all-inclusive, but rather a list of the most frequently encountered plants. There are additional plants not listed here you need to be aware of as well.

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Foods to avoid for cats and dogs

Pets are family. As a fur-parent to a cat or dog, or if you are someone thinking about adopting a new addition into your family please keep this information in mind when it comes to food in your household.

There are foods that have bad effects on animals, and can be dangerous and even toxic to pets. If your pet eats anything listed here, please contact your veterinarian or poison control hotline as soon as possible. Time is of the essence.

A few examples of foods to avoid giving your pets include:

  • Alcoholic beverages

  • Apple seeds

  • Apricot pits

  • Avocados

  • Caffeine (coffee, tea, soda)

  • Cherry Pits

  • Candy (chocolate and any candy containing the toxic sweetener Xylitol)

  • Garlic

  • Grapes

  • Gum

  • Macadamia nuts

  • Mushrooms

  • Mustard seeds

  • Nutmeg

  • Onions and onion powder

  • Peach pits

  • Raisins

  • Rhubarb leaves

  • Salt

  • Tomato leaves and stems

  • Walnuts

  • Yeast dough

*Please note that this food list is not meant to be all-inclusive, but rather a partial list of frequently encountered foods. There are additional foods not listed here that you need to be aware of as well.


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Disaster REadiness for Pets

Pets are family. As a fur-parent to a pet, or if you are someone thinking about adopting a new addition into your family please keep this information in mind so you can be ready for when a disaster happens.

In an emergency, your pets will be even more dependent on you for their safety and well-being. Even if you try to create a safe place for them, pets left behind during a disaster are likely to be injured, lost, or worse. Your family’s disaster and evacuation plans must include your pets too. If it’s not safe for you to stay behind, then it’s not safe to leave your pets behind either. Don’t wait until it is too late!

Make a plan and prepare a Pet Disaster Kit

  • Make sure your pet(s) wear collars and ID tags with up-to-date identification information (their name, your name, and contact information).

  • Make sure your pet(s) are microchipped. In case you and your pet get separated, this is the best way to ensure you are reunited.

  • Keep a leash and pet carriers near where you would exit.

  • Have leashes and pet carriers for each of your pets.

  • Keep a pet first aid kit and veterinary records.

  • Have the contact information of veterinary clinics, animal hospitals, boarding facilities, pet-friendly hotels, and rescue organizations in your area and surrounding areas. (Know ahead of time which places will accept pets in an emergency).

  • Have the contact information of friends or family outside of the disaster area (know ahead of time which friends or family members can care for your pets in an emergency).

  • If you are are not home at the time of a disaster, plan ahead of time with a few trusted neighbors to check on your pet(s).

  • Keep at least 2 weeks worth of medications, and have your vet or pharmacy contact information for refills.

  • Keep at least 2 weeks worth of pet food and water ready to take with you.

  • For cats, have a disposable litter tray ready to take with you.

  • For large animals that need to be evacuated, have enough vehicles and trailers available.


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AB 485

In the beginning of 2019, California announced it will become the first state in the U.S to prohibit the sale of dogs, cats, and rabbits in pet stores unless the animals are from shelters or rescue organizations.

AB 485, the Pet Rescue and Adoption Act, is an effort to crack down on puppy mills. The law will “require all sales of dogs and cats authorized by this provision to be in compliance with laws requiring the spaying or neutering of animals, as specified.”

As people become more aware of what truly goes on at puppy mills & commercial breeding facilities, we can create a future where every life is valued regardless if an animal is from a shelter, rescue organization, purebred, or a mixed breed.


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USDA experiments on cats

Did you know?-The Department of Agriculture was experimenting on cats and kittens.

Since the 80’s, it has used thousands of cats and kittens in taxpayer-funded research to study food borne illness.

Last month, a bipartisan bill described this as “taxpayer-funded kitten slaughter”.

There is no excuse for what has been happening to these hopeless animals from senseless government abuse. Finally, the USDA is taking the hint. The U.S Department of Agriculture said it would cease conducting research experiments on cats.

Our voices are all these animals have. We need to be their voice, and put an end to this abuse.

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The Pact Act

Reintroduced Bill seeks to make animal cruelty a federal felony across the U.S.

Two lawmakers have proposed a bill that will make animal cruelty a federal felony. The Preventing Animal Cruelty and Torture (PACT) Act was recently reintroduced to Congress in an effort to secure more protection for animals, and harsher punishments for those who hurt them. Congressman Ted Deutch and Vern Buchanan think the PACT Act will close a gap that’s existed for years.

Currently, Federal law prohibits animal fighting. And it also criminalizes animal cruelty if the wrongdoers create and sell videos depicting the act. The PACT Act, will broaden the scope of prosecutors. Those convicted under the PACT Act would face federal felony charges, fines, and up to seven years in prison.


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spay and Neuter awareness

Spaying our Neutering your cat or dog not only reduces shelter intake numbers, but it also has incredible health benefits for our companion animals.

  • Spaying or Neutering your dog or cat can decrease the risk of certain cancers and other diseases.

  • Spaying or Neutering your dog or cat decreases the changes of your pet roaming.

  • Spaying or Neutering your dog or cat can help with behavior too. This helps prevent assertive behavior and reduces the likelihood of frequent urine-marking.


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Health benefits of having a dog or cat

Nothing compares to the happiness and joy a companion animal can bring to your life. There is also a connection between pet ownership and well-being. Not only do pets bring unconditional love, loyalty, and companionship to you and your family, but there are a number of health benefits of owning a pet (physical, mental, and emotional).

  • Encourages physical activity and being outdoors

  • Improves emotional health and reduces stress

  • Increases sociability and helps instill principles of healthy behavior (compassion, empathy, and responsibility).

  • Early exposure to pets may protect children from developing allergies and asthma.